Samsung refrigerator repair training

Here at RD Appliance Service, Corp., Nassau County, Long Islands highest quality appliance repair service, we take training very seriously. Many times each year we attend training programs on new products.

Today we are attending appliance repair training sessions at Marcone Appliance Parts Supply in Commack, Long Island. We are covering the new GE washer and the new Samsung refrigerator.

Samsung refrigerator repair services are often hard to find, good ones anyway. This is due to the highly complex technical nature of Samsung appliances. Many appliance repair services don’t stay up to date on new technology.

Well we do and that’s why you can trust us with all of your Samsung appliance repair needs.

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Samsung refrigerator training

Call RD Appliance Service, Corp.  at 516-561-0523 for all of your Nassau County and Long Island appliance repair needs.

Or visit our main website at www.rdapplianceservice.com

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Miele Coffee System Repair – Nassau County, Long Island

Miele makes the finest coffee machines in the world.  They call them Miele Coffee Systems and they come in a variety of models which will not only store and grind your fresh beans, but automatically refill with water and make a nice, frothy cappuccino.

It’s often difficult for consumers to find a company to service their Miele Coffee System but here at RD Appliance Service, Corp. we’ve been repairing them for quite a while and they have become somewhat of a specialty for us.  We love the complexity of the machines and the challenge that offers us.  We have at our disposal the full line of Miele technical documentation for these machines.

Clogs are the most common problem with these Miele coffee makers.  Clogs in the dispenser, clogs in the brew unit, clogs in the tubing, clogs everywhere.  Often this is caused by flavored coffee beans.  The oils from the beans easily clog up the fine passageways and filters that the Miele coffee system uses.

If you need a Miele appliance repair call us now at 516-561-0523 or click the red button on the left to book online.

RD Appliance Service, Corp.

516-561-0523

http://www.rdapplianceservice.com

Serving Nassau County, Long Island since 1963

Kitchen Aid Built In Refrigerator Beeping – Long Island Appliance Repair

This week I’ve had two built in Kitchen Aid refrigerators with bad boards that need to be sent out for repair since Whirlpool no longer manufactures these control boards.  Both had similar symptoms.  KSSC42QMS03 pulsed the whole unit on and off, no cooling.  KSSO42FTX02 pulsed only the evaporator fan on and off, cooling ok.  Both had one bulging capacitor, see images below.  Both evaporator fans had crazy high resistance, up into mega ohms (1400-1700 ohms is normal).  So…are these things related?  I think they almost have to be.

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The Miele Dishwasher Top Rack Only Problem – Miele Dishwasher Repair

A while back we had a customer with a Miele G863 SCVI Plus dishwasher experiencing a problem we hadn’t encountered before.

Their complaint was the bottom rack was not cleaning.  I found the lower spray arm not turning at all.  The spray arm was not clogged, the filters were not clogged.  This model has a “top solo” option which blocks the water to the lower spray arm, allowing only the upper spray arms to operate.  There is a “top solo” valve (TSV) which is used to accomplish this.  It is an electromagnet that releases a ball into the water path which is held against the TSV outlet by the water pressure coming out of the circ pump.  I found nothing blocking or clogging the TSV.  I found the ball within the valve loose.  I found 120VAC to the valve, momentarily, only when the “top solo” option was selected.  I found resistance through the valve circuit, Miele does not offer specs for that.

So, to be sure I was diagnosing correctly I called Miele tech support.  The first tech essentially told me just replace the TSV, that it couldn’t be tested.  I called back after leaving the house, the second tech told me it’s testable through a component test (which is true).  He also said that the ball should only be free when power is applied, that without power it should be held in place by the TSV solenoid.  He also said that the TSV should read infinite ohms when not powered.  Only part of that made sense to me so I double checked the schematic, it looks like the TSV circuit should never be “open”, but the voltage supply is switched by the electronic.  So I think he was incorrect about reading infinite ohms without power applied.  It does make sense that the ball should only be free when top solo is selected, but I’m not certain that power needs to be applied to release the ball or if power should be applied to hold the ball.  Based on the voltage readings I think it’s likely true that voltage is applied to release the ball, because I found 120VAC to the valve for just a moment once the circulation pump started running (with top solo option selected), which leads me to believe that the TSV is powered for just long enough to release the ball once there is enough water pressure to hold it against the TSV outlet.  See schematic with line and neutral traced to the TSV and the Miele technical description of the TSV below.

miele dishwasher schematic

Miele G863 Plus schematic

Miele G863 Plus Top Solo Valve

So, the top solo valve (Part number 5268871) resolved the issue.  By the way, although it’s called a top solo valve everywhere in the tech literature, Miele’s parts department wants to call it a circulation valve.

In any case, the first image is the new top solo valve in the normal position, ie top solo option not selected.  The plunger holds the ball in place allowing water to flow through to the lower spray arm (0.68K ohms through the solenoid).  The second image is the old, broken TSV, showing the ball out of place, which is also where the ball would be if top solo was selected, blocking the water path to the lower spray arm, held in place by pressure out of the circulation pump. That is the correct orientation of the TSV, it looks like the ball simply falls back into place on the bottom once the water pressure has been reduced, allowing the plunger to hold it again.  And the third image is the broken TSV disassembled.  The plunger is broken, that collar should be against the casing.  The resistance is good though, 0.675K ohms.

Broken Miele G863 Plus Top Solo Valve tsv2tsv3

So, RD Appliance Service, Corp. successfully diagnosed and repaired another unusual problem with a Miele appliance.  If you need a Miele appliance repair call us now at 516-561-0523 or click the red button on the left to book online.

RD Appliance Service, Corp.

516-561-0523

http://www.rdapplianceservice.com

Serving Nassau County, Long Island since 1963

Miele Dishwasher Repair for Nassau County, Long Island

Here at RD Appliance Service, Corp. we understand the value of your Miele appliance.  We even use them in our own homes.  We know that Miele makes top of line appliances for people who want only the best.  We also know how to diagnose and repair them, something not every appliance repair company can say.

Our tablets are full of Miele technical documentation, we have access to Miele’s technical support website and phone line.  We stock common Miele dishwasher parts on our trucks.

So, if your Miele dishwasher is giving you trouble call us at 516-561-0523 to schedule a repair.  Or visit our website:

http://www.rdapplianceservice.com/miele.html

The Mystery of the Mysterious Miele Malady

David Oliva

RD Appliance Service, Corp. PO Box 234, Bethpage, NY, 11714

Recently RD Appliance Service was briefly confounded by a  Miele washer, a W1918, not exactly the latest model.  The complaint was that the washer would not spin out the clothing at the end of the cycle, it would leave them sopping wet.  Sometimes, if the customer re-ran the cycle the washer would spin.  So, armed with all of the necessary technical documentation and diagnostic equipment I ventured out to the home.

Upon arrival I opened up the service manual on my tablet, placed the machine into service mode and proceeded to run a spin test.  The tub spun up to high speed without a hiccup.  Hmmm, I thought.  So I exited service mode and just ran a regular spin cycle, and again the washer spun.

After questioning the customer about her use of the machine I concluded that the machine was sometimes being overloaded and that this was causing it to be unable to balance itself, thus preventing it from spinning.

Not so.

She called back the next day with the same problem, and again when I arrived the problem would not occur.  So I needed to do some more in depth research on this issue as this is no “Just replace it” type of washer, they retail for $2000 or more.  With some helpful tips from my fellow appliance technicians at appliantology.org I returned armed with more knowledge and we got it figured it.

My father and I both went back on this, two heads and all.  I called the customer about an hour before we were going to arrive and had her start a wash cycle.  This worked out well because we arrived just at the end of the cycle and found the washer not spinning.  Finally!  No spin at the end of a regular cycle, no error codes flashing.  Set it to a spin only cycle, no spin.  Put it in test mode and ran a spin test, no spin.  Alright, now we’re getting somewhere.

So, we opened up the front of the machine (thank you Miele for making the whole front panel open on a hinge!)  in order to find out if the motor was getting voltage, which would indicate a problem with the motor itself. However, this old Miele technical info does not include voltages for the motor, and the wires are all the same color and not labeled, same goes for the connectors.

We knew it uses a single winding DC motor, but that’s about as in depth as Miele gets regarding the motor.  So after exercising our finely honed diagnostic skills we determined which two wires were the motor voltage supply wires and we attached the voltmeter leads to them near the lower electronic (secondary control board).

We once again put the machine into spin and the damn thing started spinning again.  This, however, showed us the voltage used by the motor when it is working, and this is crucial information.  In case you are interested it uses ~16-20 VDC on tumble, changing polarity as it switches directions, then the voltage ramps up to a whopping 195 VDC on max spin.

Ok, so we know the motor works, but we still don’t know what’s wrong with the washer.  We began doing basic diagnostic checks once again, check and clear drain pump trap, check pressure switch hose, etc.  Nothing.  So we ran another test cycle.  This time allowing it to fill and tumble and then move to drain and spin.  Aha!  Now it won’t spin.  It tumbles a little at 16-20 VDC, then stops and won’t spin, no voltage to the motor.  Ok, good.  I suggest checking the pressure switch again.  So my father tapped the pressure switch and voila!, it starts spinning, and reads all the way up to 195 VDC again.  Yes!  The pressure switch was sticking….sometimes.

So, we’ve replaced the pressure switch and the air trap with the pressure switch hose and that old school, quality German washing machine is running like new once again.

RD Appliance Service, Corp.  Long Island Appliance Repair Since 1963.  We are committed to constant improvement in our skills as appliance repair technicians.  The above is an article detailing some of our self education in matters of appliance repair diagnostics, an area in which we strive to be the best in the business.  If you need an appliance repair anywhere in Nassau County call RD Appliance Service, Corp. at 516-561-0523 or visit our website at http://www.rdapplianceservice.com.

Centrifugal Pumps and Cavitation

David Oliva

RD Appliance Service, Corp. PO Box 234, Bethpage, NY, 11714

I recently had a customer whose washing machine would not drain. I attributed this problem to the excess of suds in the tub. The customer seemed skeptical of this diagnosis and so this problem seemed like a good topic to delve further into.

Oversudsing issues are very common in washing machines and dishwashers. Using the incorrect type, or an excess, of detergent can cause an oversuds situation. This often leads to drainage problems. The drain pump cannot pump out overly sudsy water. But why not? It’s because of something called cavitation.

Cavitation is the formation of vapor cavities in a liquid. Washing machines and dishwashers use centrifugal pumps. A centrifugal pump needs an uninterrupted supply of water to function properly. The spinning impeller causes the water inside the pump to spin as well, creating centrifugal force, which causes the water to flow away from the center, or inlet, of the pump and out of the discharge port. This displacement creates negative pressure which sucks more water into the pump. Introduction of suds, which are mostly air, into a spinning impeller will interrupt the flow of water and introduce air into the system, disrupting the vacuum being created, and ultimately preventing the pump from being able to discharge the water. This will not be resolved until the suds are eliminated. Fabric softener or vegetable oil can be added to the machine to help to eliminate the suds and allow the pump to finish draining the water.

The video below is a brief introduction to the way in which centrifugal pumps function.

RD Appliance Service, Corp.  Long Island Appliance Repair Since 1963.  We are committed to constant improvement in our skills as appliance repair technicians.  The above is an article detailing some of our self education in matters of appliance repair diagnostics, an area in which we strive to be the best in the business.  If you need an appliance repair anywhere in Nassau County call RD Appliance Service, Corp. at 516-561-0523 or visit our website at http://www.rdapplianceservice.com.